Het Rotterdamse Roleplayers Gilde Forum Index Het Rotterdamse Roleplayers Gilde
Where knowledgeable wizards of escapism dwell.
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   GebruikersgroepenGebruikersgroepen   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen 

Dobbelsteenloze RPG's!

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Het Rotterdamse Roleplayers Gilde Forum Index -> Game Masters
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Thekkur
Monostero


Geregistreerd op: 17-5-2004
Berichten: 4016
Woonplaats: Amsterdam

BerichtGeplaatst: Ma Mrt 06, 2006 8:52 am    Onderwerp: Dobbelsteenloze RPG's! Reageer met quote

Dit is de Roleplayingtips van deze week. Ik kan hem nog niet linken, want hij staat nog niet online. Toch wil ik hem niet onhouden aan diegenen die geen abonnement hebben op wekelijkse RPGtips van John Four!

van www.roleplayingtips.com




WHY GO DICELESS? Readers Respond

Last week I posted a reader request for information and tips
about playing diceless RPGs. As usual, the Roleplaying Tips
community responded generously with opinions, information,
and advice. Thanks! Below are a few of the e-mails I
received.


1. Almost Everyone Has Already Played Diceless
From: Vitenka
============================================================
Look at the Amber Diceless Roleplaying and Everway games.
Both give lots of good guidance on the subject.

* Why go diceless?

Ever had to fudge a roll to make the story go well? Ever
known what should happen and found the rules you're using
don't support it well? Then systemless resolution might be
for you.

I'd also link to the long article "Everyone has played
diceless," but I can't find the URL. The gist of it is
that, whenever you're just talking and planning, whenever
you're doing things that the system doesn't cover, you've
been playing diceless. Almost everyone has played that way
at some time, and those bits are often the best part of the
game.

After all, describing your mighty swing across the void,
describing how you catch the falling princess, coming up
with your plan to infiltrate the Baron's airship posing as
an aerial pizza delivery person...those are the main fun in
a game.


* What decision-making criteria to use?

My typical process is:

0) If it's player vs. the world or NPC, the player gets
their way. There may be difficulties added, but the player
gets to do their thing. NPCs don't have feelings.

1) Can I describe what happens in both branches? If not,
automatically choose the one I can describe.

2) Are both of them fun? Does something cool (for whatever
value of cool suits your game) happen in both options? If
not, choose the one players will enjoy.

3) Does one player have more invested in this conflict than
the others? They win about three times in four, unless
defeat is part of their story.

4) Is one of the choices freaking unlikely? Choose it one
time in three. Otherwise, choose the likely one.

5) Compare statistics.


* How do I create suspense without randomness?

Tell different kinds of stories. The in-game question isn't,
"Can I do it?" The question is, "Should I do it?"

Moral dilemmas work fine. Mysteries work fine.

And remember, the player can't tell the difference between
"The GM has decided this dragon is a wuss and will run
away," and "The GM rolled a dice and the dragon failed its
morale check."


* How do I eliminate predictability?

Personally, I don't. The story will be obeyed. However, I
think the question was more:

"How do I make a bad guy the players can sometimes, but not
always, beat?"

The answer: sometimes, but not always, the players beat him.
Follow the structure of novels, for example. A bad guy might
be beaten, return in stealth, triumph for a while, and then
be defeated again. You don't need dice to decide that, and
it's often quite hard for dice to emulate that. With the GM
in control, it happens every time it needs to.


* How to avoid being arbitrary?

This one is hard. Try keeping track of your decisions. At
the end of a session total it up. If you find you've been
too harsh on one particular player then try to be nicer to
them next session.


* How do I adjudicate success and failure?

Lots of ways. The systems split fairly easily into:

1) Completely arbitrary. The GM decides. Perhaps with
inspiration from the tarot, perhaps obeying internal
dictates of the story. Perhaps trying to be fair, or fairly
random.

1a) Yes - but. Always success. Whenever you can think of
something interesting as a complication, throw it in.

2) Investment. Players have a pool of points, and if they
sink enough points into something then they triumph, though
that leaves them with fewer points to triumph with
elsewhere. (See the game Nobilis.)

3) Ovation. The other players vote (perhaps formally,
perhaps in secret) and if they all like the idea or the
description then success.


2. For D&D - Take 10 All The Time
From: Keith LaBaw & Adrian Pommier
============================================================
I've never tried to run an entire game diceless, but between
tabletop sessions my group does a lot of interim scenes with
an online forum. Instead of trying to do die rolls online or
deal with the honor system, we just use the following
guideline: all d20 rolls are a "take 10."

Since most of our interim scenes involve contested skills
more than actual combat (e.g. Bluff vs. Sense Motive) this
works well. It can also be applied to combat for to hit
rolls and saves. On the rare occasion that damage comes into
play, we do a similar median approach (half the total
possible damage)

Suspense is maintained by a bit of GM secrecy. Sure, you
know you can hit AC 18 because you're at +8 on your attack,
but if you don't know what the enemy's AC is, there's still
an element of risk if you try it. Same applies for contested
skills and saves...especially skills and saving throws where
you don't immediately know success.


3. Listen And Craft Good Descriptions
From: Jeremy Penter
============================================================
I have used diceless gaming now for over 17 years, creating
my own systems or using others. More important than any
system I have used, however, is the DM's ability to listen.

Much decision making, resolution, storytelling, and
excitement can be gained by listening to the players.
Extract information from them, such as how are they standing
or the look on their faces when talking to an NPC.

With no numbers to go on, you will need to get more
information from the players anyway. You will soon discover
you are using the same triggers with your NPCs,
descriptions, and general storytelling.

These small triggers can assist you in the resolution
department. Does the player stand with hands clenched but
smiling? What reaction does this create in an NPC who sees
this duality of body suggestions? It can even come down to
how intimidating a character is. A small child performing
such an action has a wholly different subtext than a bulking
half-orc.

Borrow from everything. Movie scenes, book scenes, scenes in
the news. Pay attention to the underlying feelings and
reactions. Slowly change up the scenes to your liking as you
grow comfortable and adapt in-game.

Concerning decisions, I make them based on what I have seen
in real life, read, and think is plausible or fitting for
the story.

My decision for actions are based on the following:

* Environment.
* Previous action taken.
* Action being undertaken.
* Character's general physical and mental well-being.
* How it develops the story. Does it create suspense,
action, drama?

With practice, I found decisions could be made in seconds,
and much faster than rolling dice.

Eliminating predictability. Some people find predictability
a painful thing; I find it a part of life. Many things in
life are predictable, such as a character's ability to cast
a spell or hit a normal foe. The occasional flub occurs
much less often than the predictable hit. What matters is
changing up your descriptions occasionally, and making
lively, breathing NPCs.

Therefore, when the goblin suddenly retreats down the tunnel
but is careful to only walk on the right side, it becomes a
sign that perhaps things aren't as they seem. Everything
from normal roleplaying can be used in diceless gaming to
make your game more enjoyable. Embellish flavor text with an
eye toward what is thought and perceived versus what is
known with hard numbers. Trust me, the difference is
noticeable.


4. Hide The Danger
From: Anthony Hart-Jones
============================================================
* Why go diceless?

The main reason for going diceless, when I have done so, has
been to eliminate the rather impersonal nature of the D20.
Most DMs will fudge rolls from time to time. Perhaps they
have dropped your villain to a single hit-point and his
final attack-round comes up three criticals on the party's
cleric. Their plan was perfect but maybe the party just kept
rolling 1's.

To me, diceless is about the planning and the details. There
are no bad rolls, only bad tactics. Sometimes, your
villain's master plan will have a fatal flaw. Sometimes the
players' plan will have a small oversight that scuppers
them. In this way, you still have luck, but you also have
less randomness.


* What decision-making criteria to use?

o Logic. Is this likely to succeed?

o Drama. If this were a film, would it work? The character
(a skilled driver) wants to execute a hand-break turn and
come to a complete stop outside the bank being robbed. You
let him because it is dramatic. In a gunfight, a character
takes a risk and you have a bullet clip his shoulder.

o Humour, if applicable. Would this be funny?

o Fortune favours the bold. Does the player deserve to
succeed? The player character is outmatched by the swordsman
and is bleeding from 20 cuts, but refuses to give in because
the princess needs only thirty seconds more until the mice
finish gnawing through her bonds. He is losing but that does
not mean he must die.

o Consider dramatic imperative. Is this necessary to the
plot?

o Punish idiots. Is this a bad plan or is it complete
stupidity? In the middle of a pitched battle, the party's
fighter sheathes his sword and lifts his kilt to taunt the
enemy. First offence, I will normally let them live, but a
crossbow bolt is not always lethal, and just think what the
most tempting target is going to be....


* How do I create suspense without randomness?

To borrow from Lovecraft, hide the danger. The players will
fear what they catch from the corner of their eye more than
the hellhound in the same room. After all, you can fight
something you can see. The creaking of floorboards behind
them as someone moves on the stairs is going to create
tension.


* How do I eliminate predictability?

o With variation. Even in a security force, you have better
shots and worse shots.

o Vary the styles of combat. The first goon might lead with
a strong offense, the next might be defensive.

o Vary your language. The first attacker might "thrust
boldly at your unprotected flank," while the second "tries to
skewer you on his wicked blade." Once the players start to
think of NPCs as individuals, they stop expecting the same
actions from each of them.


* How to avoid being arbitrary?

Remain open-minded. Players will surprise you with their
ingenuity sometimes, and shock you with their suicidal plans
at others. React in-character yourself. They surprised you,
so they probably surprised the villain. Give them their due.


* How do I adjudicate success and failure?

Compare your image of the events with the player's intent,
then add a large dose of judgement. Does the plan have
merit? Is it better than anything you expected from them?
Would it serve an important purpose to break from the
expected outcome?


5. Diceless Requires Trust
From: Bobby Nichols
============================================================
Diceless role-playing requires a high level of trust between
GM and players. You have to trust your GM to steer you away
from encounters that are potentially deadly. You also have
to listen to the GM and pay attention, for he might use
detail and setting to tell you things that aren't readily
apparent.

For example, color description might be used to tell a
player the black stone in this area is slippery. Then a
combat starts and you have to remember this to maneuver your
opponent into making a mistake, or use it to give yourself
an advantage.


6. Craft Interesting Encounters That Don't Rely On Chance
From: David Saggers
============================================================
I prefer an encounter to be interesting and fun, not reliant
on chance. Paranoia is a great game for how I like to GM -
just go with what fits the moment!

I tend not rely on dice much because, as a GM, I always roll
well and this is bad for my players. By going diceless, I
have also saved time and effort by not making and consulting
charts, looking up stats and calculating modifiers, etc. If
you need random, roll the dice - low is bad, high is good!
You can override the result, but why not save game time and
choose?


7. Keep Rounds Short To Avoid Decision Difficulty
From: Jim M.
============================================================
Try this: without discussion, players and GM decide their
plans of action. Then the players reveal their intended
actions and the GM compares this to what he decided the NPCs
were going to do. Then the GM decides and narrates the
result.

Rounds or time increments during action scenes should be
short to limit the complexity of the actions and to better
gauge consequences.


8. Fortune And Karma
From: Eric Wirsing
============================================================
The bulk of diceless systems are fortune-based (borrowing
the term from Jonathan Tweet, from the Everway RPG).
Fortune-based games are random, based on dice, cards, etc.
The great disadvantage of a fortune-based game is the
ridiculous things that can happen due to chance, like
failing every roll, or having a grandmaster of lockpicking
slip and break a finger (true stories).

The resolution systems of diceless games are many and
varied. In Amber, it's arbitrary Karma (to borrow another
term from Mr. Tweet). I have a 20, you have a 19, I win. In
other games, you might be able to positively influence
outcomes with a pool of points (such as Nobilis, Active
Exploits, Marvel Universe, and Dying Earth), all of which
are Karma and resource management.

Drama is the third mode, where you narrate what happens,
without resorting to numbers. For example, Theatrix uses
flow charts to dictate the action based on the plot. It
asks, does dramatic necessity require a specific outcome?
Does the hero get away safely with the girl, or is there
something more interesting and appropriate that needs to
happen?

One way to avoid being predictable is to avoid the arbitrary
systems. Something that is almost entirely GM fiat (or
Drama) might spin out of control. "Uh oh, prepare for a bad
night, guys. Jim had a hard day at work. Our characters are
hosed." Creating suspense is easy in a Karma/Resource
Management game. Rather than "does my character succeed or
fail" it now becomes "what comes next in the story, and are
we up to it?"

Diceless systems that allow bidding add to the suspense. How
many points can I throw in? Will it be enough? What happens
if I need to spend more than I have? How do I get my
effectiveness back? Do I risk it all in the hopes I win or
do I hold back some points to use as a defense?

RPG.net is loaded with reviews of diceless systems. Dying
Earth gets points for style, as there are multiple ways to
achieve a single objective, and everything from Combat to
Persuasion has different aspects that you choose. Nobilis is
an ethereal game that takes combat out of the mix entirely.
Active Exploits probably comes closest to a generic game,
where you can play any style of game that you like.

If you're looking into diceless, why not try free? The
complete rules for Active Exploits are available. At 70+
pages it's not light reading, but it will give you a good,
solid introduction to diceless roleplaying.

http://www.rpgnow.com/product_info.php?products_id=2251&
http://www.drivethrurpg.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=2589

If you want to know what Dying Earth is all about, visit
their website:

http://www.dyingearth.com/article1.htm
http://www.dyingearth.com/article2.htm
http://www.dyingearth.com/article3.htm
http://www.dyingearth.com/article4.htm
http://www.dyingearth.com/article5.htm

Marvel Universe, as the name might suggest, is about gaming
with Captain America, Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, etc.
I can't find the official site anymore, but here's a fan
site: http://murpg.krabbit.com/murpg3.php

Nobilis is a strange gem of a game. To get a good idea of
it, here's a fan site for it:
http://www.chancel.org/whatis.html
_________________
"Stop! Jullie komen niet langs mij! Glupert heeft jullie snode plannen door!"
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht MSN Messenger
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Di Mrt 07, 2006 4:08 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Erg leuke info. Het heeft ook wel wat zonder dobbelstenen spelen en ik denk ook wel dt iedereen het wel eens heeft gedaan. Wat schade aanpassen, of een critical hit aanpassen van een 'bad guy'.
Het zal denk ik wel wat wennen zijn in het begin en helemaal zonder dobbelstenen vechten? Ach misschien gewoon eens proberen.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Wo Mrt 08, 2006 1:25 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

http://www.darkshire.net/~jhkim/rpg/theory/rgfa/faq_v0/faq3.art
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Thekkur
Monostero


Geregistreerd op: 17-5-2004
Berichten: 4016
Woonplaats: Amsterdam

BerichtGeplaatst: Wo Mrt 08, 2006 3:56 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Echt wel interessant. Tnx voor die link Karma! Eigenlijk speel ik al grotendeels 'diceless', maar in combat situaties is het toch nog wel onvermijdelijk. Helaas... het vertraagd het spel behoorlijk, en je kan je er een stuk minder door inleven.

Mijns inziens is het spelen met of zonder dice vooral gelieerd aan het doel dat je met de game wilt bereiken. Wil je 'een spel' spelen, of gaat het meer om storytelling en interactie. Meer dan genoeg tips hier om serieus een keer 'diceless' te spelen. Diceless hoeft niet perse 'rule-less' te betekenen.
_________________
"Stop! Jullie komen niet langs mij! Glupert heeft jullie snode plannen door!"
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht MSN Messenger
Thekkur
Monostero


Geregistreerd op: 17-5-2004
Berichten: 4016
Woonplaats: Amsterdam

BerichtGeplaatst: Di Mrt 28, 2006 7:42 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bedenk ik mij plotseling iets... als je als GM altijd achter je schermpje speelt speel je eigenlijk al diceless. Spelers hebben welliswaar de illusie dat er een 'random' element in de game zit, en die illusie kan al genoeg zijn om de voorspelbaarheid weg te halen. Ondertussen heeft de GM de touwtjes stevig in handen.

Stelling: je moet eerst mét dice kunnen spelen voordat je diceless gaat spelen.
_________________
"Stop! Jullie komen niet langs mij! Glupert heeft jullie snode plannen door!"
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht MSN Messenger
Lord Xcapobl
Ridder


Geregistreerd op: 23-5-2006
Berichten: 214
Woonplaats: Rotterdam

BerichtGeplaatst: Do Jun 15, 2006 6:20 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Noem het maar raar, maar het blijft een heerlijk gevoel die tikkende stukjes plastic (of soms andere materialen) in de hand te hebben, ze te schudden, en ze in volle spanning na te staren terwijl ze wel of niet hun werk gaan doen.
Very Happy
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Thekkur
Monostero


Geregistreerd op: 17-5-2004
Berichten: 4016
Woonplaats: Amsterdam

BerichtGeplaatst: Do Jun 15, 2006 7:01 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

heheh, daar zit ook wel iets in! het is de charme van de dobbelstenen... maar dan moet je natuurlijk wél leesbare dobbelstenen hebben!
_________________
"Stop! Jullie komen niet langs mij! Glupert heeft jullie snode plannen door!"
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht MSN Messenger
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Do Jun 15, 2006 11:23 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

soms zijn de dobbelstenen bizar logisch qua uitkomst, laatste zondag sessie hbeik echt een aantal keren gehad dat , als iemand iets bizars moeilijk uit wilde halen laag gegooid werd, terwijl bij een heroische actie zoals een vrined bevrijden door een gigantische sprong van een hoog platform op een watermonster te maken wel weer lukt.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Lord Xcapobl
Ridder


Geregistreerd op: 23-5-2006
Berichten: 214
Woonplaats: Rotterdam

BerichtGeplaatst: Za Jun 17, 2006 8:46 am    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Karma schreef:
soms zijn de dobbelstenen bizar logisch qua uitkomst


Precies nog een reden om niet meer in toeval te geloven, en de dobbelstenen hun werk te laten doen?
Cool
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Za Jun 17, 2006 12:17 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

tja aan de andere kant heb ik inmiddels hele gave sessies meegemaakt waar minimaal aan dobbelstenen klinken
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Wijlen Fandath Ryne
Good Lord


Geregistreerd op: 14-10-2004
Berichten: 2898
Woonplaats: in een naamloos graf

BerichtGeplaatst: Za Jun 17, 2006 12:27 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Er is een groot verschil tussen een gering gebruik van dobbelstenen en helemaal geen gebruik van dobbelstenen. Ik laat de speler niet dobbelen als hij iets wil doen dat zijn held redelijkerwijze kan, ook al is het in theorie mogelijk dat het mis gaat. Maar wel als het echt niet zo duidelijk is. Toeval speelt nu eenmaal een grote rol in het leven, dus een rollenspel waarbij die factor niet bestaat is niet erg realistisch.
_________________
"Fulminictus...Fulminictus....gauw! Geef me het toverboek!" riep de magier, alert als immer

Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Bekijk de homepage
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Za Jun 17, 2006 4:03 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Uiteraard, bij iedere trap drempel of afstapje laten gooien gaat snel vervelen. En heeft weinig zin.

Toch lijkt het diceless spelen me wel wat!
Het wordt ook wel toegepast bij bijvoorbeeld een haast onoverwinnelijke vijand die alleen door slimme truukjes kan overwonnen worden ipv gelukkig dobbelen.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Di Aug 03, 2010 8:44 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

wauw, ik kwam dit weer eens tegen.

Leuk dat ik diceless systeem dadelijk echt ga toepassen. Best typisch dat ik dit indertijd blijkbaar al een boeiend onderwerp vond, maar toch weer naar de achtergrond is verdwenen.

Overigens, nu zie ik fudge ook bij diceless staan. Toch houdt ik de dobbelstenen als optie open voor het geval dat...

Waarom diceless? Dit trekt me wel aan:
Quote:
> 1) explicit trust in the GM
> 2) can't hide behind bad/good rolls
> 3) forces players to take responsability for their actions
> 4) changes the player/gm communication style from mechanistic
> to more descriptive
> 5) increases subjectivity
> 6) changes the whole nature of combat

Het blijft toch maar de vraag of het spel zonder dobbelstenen echt bevalt natuurlijk. De spanning van de kans van een dobbelsteenrol heeft namelijk toch ook wel wat, niet?

Toch een spannend verhaal, een spannende film, blijft spannend en heeft niet de onderbreking van een ogenblik dobbelstenen rollen.
En het feit dat een mislukking ook (juist!) leuke, interessante en spannende ogenblikken opleveren, vind ik ook een geruststellende gedachten om het prettig in te voegen.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Rogier
de Grote


Geregistreerd op: 23-2-2007
Berichten: 2452
Woonplaats: Sint-Oedenrode

BerichtGeplaatst: Wo Aug 04, 2010 10:22 am    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Wijlen Fandath Ryne schreef:
Toeval speelt nu eenmaal een grote rol in het leven, dus een rollenspel waarbij die factor niet bestaat is niet erg realistisch.


Dit is interessant. Is het zo dat 'toeval' veel in het leven kan bepalen?
Is toeval in andere woorden te omschrijven als geluk of zowel geluk als pech?

Als je succesvolle mensen zou vragen hoe de persoon in kwestie zo succesvol is geworden, zullen ze zelf eerder de factoren (bijvoorbeeld:) 'hard werken', 'boven gemiddelde kennis van zaken' en/of 'deskundigheid op verschillende vlakken' aan henzelf toeschrijven dan dat ze gewoon geluk hebben gehad, of dat ze er knap uitzien en daardoor een toffe baan hebben gescoord die hen succesvol (heeft) maakt.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Thekkur
Monostero


Geregistreerd op: 17-5-2004
Berichten: 4016
Woonplaats: Amsterdam

BerichtGeplaatst: Wo Aug 04, 2010 10:28 am    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Natuurlijk is de factor toeval van belang, maar misschien niet altijd zoveel als in DnD... Vaardigheid en kennis zijn ook erg belangrijk. Maar hoe vaak komt het voor dat iets PRECIES zo gebeurt als je van plan bent? Zelden! Dat is ook gelijk een handvat voor de GM. Voeg altijd elementen toe aan het resultaat van een actie die maken dat een speler nieuwe keuzes moet maken.
_________________
"Stop! Jullie komen niet langs mij! Glupert heeft jullie snode plannen door!"
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht MSN Messenger
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Wo Aug 04, 2010 11:15 am    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Succesvolle mensen zeggen ook vaak: tja het kwam gewoon op mijn pad.
Of: ik heb jaren moeten werken en toen ineens (vaak wanneer ze het niet hadden verwacht) heb je een doorbraak.

In rpg bepaald de GM natuurlijk wat er interessant is / kan zijn om op het pad tegen te komen. En de spelers kunnen lekker op los leven en dingen doen die waarschijnlijk in het echte leven niet zouden doen. Het bedenken van: "wat als ... "

De vraag of een spel niet realistisch is zonder het kanselement is misschien geeneens zo belangrijk als je samen een interessant verhaal wilt vertellen.

Eigenlijk is het resultaat een losse actie in een verhaal niet zo van belang, zolang het maar een spannend verhaal blijft. Het is vaak zelfs zo dat hindernissen, foutjes, ongelukken, dingen die dus mis gaan juist die momenten zijn die het spannend maken.

Maar wel dus fijn als handelingen waar een personage vaardig in is goed gaan En dus je kwaliteiten een hoge slagingskans hebben, maar er zijn altijd mensen beter ergens in en soms zit het je tegen (vooral als dat een beter verhaal verteld).
Ook fijn als spelers met hun 'mankementen' tijdens het rpg-en zichzelf verder in de nesten werkt.

Maar vooral lijkt me leuk dat het proces uitspelen belangrijker dat wordt dan de kans.

pff lang verhaal.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Wijlen Fandath Ryne
Good Lord


Geregistreerd op: 14-10-2004
Berichten: 2898
Woonplaats: in een naamloos graf

BerichtGeplaatst: Zo Aug 15, 2010 12:16 am    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Succes ontstaat deels toevallig, maar je kunt het toeval natuurlijk wel een handje helpen door erg je best te doen. Aan de andere kant: al werk je nog zo hard, zonder een beetje geluk kom je er niet.

Maar dat bedoelde ik eigenlijk niet. Het gaat er meer om dat grote gebeurtenissen in het leven, of zelfs in de wereldgeschiedenis, vaak nogal toevallig tot stand komen. Als een paar dingen net even anders waren gelopen, was er gewoon iets heel anders gebeurd, met heel andere gevolgen.
_________________
"Fulminictus...Fulminictus....gauw! Geef me het toverboek!" riep de magier, alert als immer

Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Bekijk de homepage
Karma
Supreme Grandmaster


Geregistreerd op: 11-9-2005
Berichten: 1741
Woonplaats: Dordrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: Za Sep 11, 2010 3:16 pm    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik vind dit nog steeds een geweldig mooi topic!

Uit eigen ervaring met twee lange sessies bijna geheel zonder dobbelstenenen en met een half in elkaar geflanste 'character sheet'*, werkt het ook nog!

Grote voordeel is gewoon dat het veel meer ruimte biedt aan de spelers voor eigen invulling.
Kan eenieder eens aanraden om meer of geheel zonder dobbelstenen te spelen. Smile


* eigenlijk bedoel ik hier: een doordacht systeem ruimte biedt om jouw eigenschappen in te vullen tijdens het spel ipv ervoor.
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Het Rotterdamse Roleplayers Gilde Forum Index -> Game Masters Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

Ga naar:  

Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001 phpBB Group

Chronicles phpBB2 theme by Jakob Persson (http://www.eddingschronicles.com). Stone textures by Patty Herford.